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The Woodman Family Foundation was established by Betty Woodman (1930-2018) and George Woodman (1932-2017) during their lifetimes. Love of beauty was at the heart of their lives and art. In this spirit, the Foundation is dedicated to stewarding the artistic legacies of Betty, George, and their daughter, Francesca Woodman (1958-1981).

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From the Archives...
Betty Woodman’s Chinese Pleasure (2007-2008) was commissioned by the U.S. Department of State Art in Embassies Program for the United States Embassy in Beijing. Woodman was inspired by and freely borrowed from visual influences all over the world and throughout art history, here incorporating three distinct moments in the history of Chinese art, ranging from Sichuan bronzes to popular culture into this dramatic installation.
From the Archives...
From 1972-1973, Francesca Woodman studied at Abbot Academy, one of the few high schools in the US at the time to offer a concentrated art program. It was there that Francesca met Wendy Snyder MacNeil, her earliest, highly influential teacher who introduced her to the creative and expressive capabilities of photography.
From the Archives...
In 1960, after returning to Boulder, Colorado, from their first year together in Italy, the Woodman family moved into the Sirotkin House. One of more than a dozen modernist homes in Boulder by architect Tician Papachristou, the house was designed for the original owner as a pair with the house next door.
Francesca Woodman: New York Works at Victoria Miro Venice, October 31-December 12
This exhibition centers on a rare series of color photographs that Francesca Woodman staged in her New York apartment in 1979.
From the Archives...
George Woodman’s The Rochester Carpet was a sprawling, patterned mosaic temporarily covering the floor of the Bevier Gallery at Rochester Institute of Technology in December of 1984. This site-specific work was just one of the artist’s ambitious and encompassing tile projects, extending his earlier practice as an abstract painter by employing complex systems of pattern and color across public spaces.
From the Archives...
In 1987, Betty Woodman began her work at the Manufacture nationale de Sèvres, as an artist invited by the French Ministry of Culture. Over the course of more than twenty years, she made a series of sculptural vases and cups and saucers in brilliantly decorated porcelain, later shown at the Palazzo Pitti in her adopted home city of Florence.
From the Archives...
In the spring of 1980, Francesca Woodman’s 'Blueprint for a Temple' was included in the exhibition 'Beyond Photography' at the Alternative Museum in New York City. This ambitiously-scaled work, made from photographs printed on architect’s blueprint paper, is now in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
From the Archives...
Beginning in 1965, Betty, George, Charlie and Francesca Woodman spent an influential year together as a family in Italy, immersed in museums, art, and culture. Their affinity for Florence took root, leading to the acquisition of a farmhouse in Antella several years later that has served as a family and creative nucleus ever since.
George Woodman and Betty Woodman featured in newly released "Pattern, Crime & Decoration" exhibition catalogue
The catalogue for Pattern, Crime & Decoration—a two-part exhibition at MAMCO, Geneva and Le Consortium, Dijon —focuses on the work of artists associated with the Pattern and Decoration movement in the US. It includes paintings by George Woodman and wall-based ceramic sculptures by Betty Woodman.
From the Archives...
During his 2004 residency at Grand Arts in Kansas City, Missouri, George Woodman continued his work with one-of-a-kind, large-scale still life photographs, made using a camera obscura.
From the Archives...
Her exhibition in the Matrix series at Wadsworth Atheneum in 1992 helped to define a context for Betty Woodman's work in ceramics within the larger world of contemporary art, highlighting "that Woodman sees herself ‘dealing with painting as much as with sculpture.'"
From the Archives...
Not long after Francesca Woodman arrived in Rome in 1977 on the RISD European Honors Program, she discovered the surrealist bookshop Maldoror, where she later had her first solo exhibition in Europe. She made unique, individual invitations to the show, each featuring one of her photographs attached to a postcard.